You can have it all, but can you do it all?

Being organised, yes.

Yesterday I went to a school Mum’s coffee morning (it’s the closest I can suffer being reasonably introverted, yet needing to at least be recognised occasionally by human beings who aren’t related to me).

There I met a writer – she never said what she writes – who has four kids, one of them a toddler. So she writes late at night.

When I had a toddler, I wrote or crafted in the weekends only, or later into the evening. Once she got older, it got harder, then easier. Now I have the whole school day to myself. No excuses, I have it all, just need to do it all.

Getting in Touch

Yesterday I reblogged Natalie’s superhero bio tips, so might as well add to the package with a post from ‘The Daily Post’ on contact pages.

The Daily Post

We’ve talked about the importance of adding an About page to your blog. So, what about a Contact page? Part of blogging and building your audience is about developing a connection to your readers so they come back to your blog over and over again. It’s natural for your followers to be curious about who you are when you’re not sitting at your computer replying to comments or getting ready to hit the big, blue Publish button.

Providing your readers with a contact form enables them to get in touch with you beyond just leaving a comment on your post. This is especially useful if you’re using your blog to build a business or to get started as a paid writer. Additionally, adding a contact form to your site will allow other bloggers and collaborators to get in touch about all those awesome new projects they would love your feedback on…

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Really thought-provoking post, reminding me that a great book for one person is not that good for others – and that somewhere out there are the right readers for any author. Including me.

The Seven Deadly Sins of Prologues

There’s been a lot on the blogosphere lately about the evils of prologues. It’s been going on for years. But if Harry Potter can start off in book one with Chapter 1 being basically a disguised prologue, then so can I. My first thriller has one, as Chapter One – it’s brief and sets the scene, following some of the principles Kristen Lamb is talking about here.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

To prologue or not to prologue? That is the question. The problem with the prologue is it has kind of gotten a bad rap over the years, especially with agents. They generally hate them. Why? In my opinion, it is because far too many writers don’t use prologues properly and that, in itself, has created its own problem. Because of the steady misuse of prologues, most readers skip them. Thus, the question of whether or not the prologue is even considered the beginning of your novel can become a gray area if the reader just thumbs pages until she sees Chapter One.

So without further ado…

The 7 Deadly Sins of Prologues

Sin #1 If your prologue is really just a vehicle for massive information dump…

In my critique group, one of the first tasks each member must do is they must write detailed backgrounds of all characters. I make…

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Barbara McDowell provides an excellent intro to horror as a genre.

Nicole Basaraba's Uni-Verse-City

Welcome to Writers’ Uni-Verse-City (or WUVC for short because every university has an acronym), a place where writers/bloggers can meet to discuss the craft of writing in the Internet age. WUVC will involve independent research, setting a curriculum and hopefully finding other participants (like you – readers/bloggers/writers) to: chip in, give tips, suggest books and other materials for study, teach me the ways of the warrior writer, and offer to guest post here at Uni-Verse-City (contact: annotationseditorial@gmail.com).

I am pleased to welcome guest, Barbara McDowell for the Literary Genre Blog Series running through February, March and into April. Barbara is going to let us in on the Horror genre, what the subgenres are and how to really make the readers’ hair stand on end. I’m slowing backing away, its all your Barbara.

Why Horror? For most horror writers, I’m sure this question has been asked of them in varying forms: “Why would you…

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Bookstores are Closing & Amazon is Expanding–Want a Sure Bet in an Uncertain Future?

Kristen Lamb tells us to blog, share and comment.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

As many of you already know, historically, novelists have endured a mind-numbing failure rate. Even up to 2007, traditionally published novelists only had a 1 in 9 chance of ever seeing a second book in print. Most writers failed to sell through their print run (per BEA statistics) and had to return to the day job to pay the bills. Ah, but the times, they are a changin’ and it is a WONDERFUL time to be a writer.

As many of you already know (especially the WANAlums), I happen to be a HUGE proponent of writers having a blog. A GOOD blog that people actually want to read. But, I get it. Some of you might not believe you have time or perhaps you aren’t ready to start a blog. Okay. Fair enough. Today’s advice is for you. Oh, and it is also for ALL writers, even those who have…

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Elizabeth S. Craig guests posts at Nicole Basaraba’s blog – which is currently doing a series on genre.

Nicole Basaraba's Uni-Verse-City

Welcome to Writers’ Uni-Verse-City (or WUVC for short because every university has an acronym), a place where writers/bloggers can meet to discuss the craft of writing in the Internet age. WUVC will involve independent research, setting a curriculum and hopefully finding other participants (like you – readers/bloggers/writers) to: chip in, give tips, suggest books and other materials for study, teach me the ways of the warrior writer, and offer to guest post here at Uni-Verse-City (contact: annotationseditorial@gmail.com).

I am pleased to welcome guest, Elizabeth S. Craig here to kick off the Literary Genre Blog Series running through February, March and into April, and give us a clue as to how to write a traditional murder mystery. Please enlighten us Elizabeth. 

I think mysteries are fun to write. Not only that, but they’re fairly easy to write. Although the structure of these stories sometimes scares off new writers, it’s actually the structure…

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R-E-S-P-E-C-T isn’t FREE!!!

This is a long post and followup to Kristen Lamb’s blog about ‘FREE’. Both are well worth the read.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

 

Last week in What’s the Problem with FREE!? we talked about how giving away FREE! downloads of our books can actually do more harm than good. I also gave an example of the software company that refused to offer anything for FREE! back in the dot.com boom in the 90s when all the competition was handing out goodies left and right. When every other dot.com was giving away golf shirts, trips, goodies and software for FREE! this company stood firm and offered nothing…for nothing.

Don’t get me wrong, this company gave away FREE! stuff. They just didn’t give it away for free ;).

Free! is Best When It Isn’t Free

I read J.A. Konrath’s  and Bob Mayer’s blogs because both of them provide a lot of valuable insight for the writing professional. At first it might seem that Konrath and Mayer and I would disagree, that we would be…

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