How to Use a Sprint Journal

Really like this idea for quick planning out of writing work each day. Via Ramona DeFelice Long

Ramona DeFelice Long

RamonaGravitarLike many writers, I keep a notebook called a book bible. The book bible for my current WIP, a novel written in the episodic style, is a beat-up, bright green notebook with fraying pages, a precarious spiral spine, and an array of Post-its in various shapes and colors poking from the edges.journals

A book bible is used to record ideas, changes, concepts, goals, for a work in progress. It’s a planning aid. This post, however, is not about book bibles; I am introducing the book bible idea to get it out of the way. What I want to discuss today is my Sprint Journal.

I own a lot of pretty journals. Many of them are pristine inside. When I was a young girl, I invariably received a diary for my birthday, and those remained blank as well. I stink at keeping a diary or personal journal, and while I continue…

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Reblog: Publishing Is Easy

As usual, David Gaughran makes sense. We need to get the word out – publishing is easy. All the rest – not so much.

David Gaughran

publish

There are three primary tasks a writer must undertake to get her work into the hands of readers: writing, publishing, and marketing.

Out of those three, I respectfully submit, publishing is by far the easiest.

Writing

Writing a book is hard, and writing a good book is even harder – at least from the perspective of the inexperienced writer. Most people who think about writing a book never start one. Most people who start one never finish it. And most people who finish a book never polish it to the point where it’s ready for prime-time and/or never get it out the door for one reason or another.

To write a good book, you have to put in the time in terms of reading with intent, learning about the craft, gaining mastery of the tools at your disposal, and putting all that into practice with book after book (some of…

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Congratulations to Man Booker prize winner Eleanor Catton

Not only is the Man Booker prize winner a kiwi, but a thriller author at that. Double brownies to her!

Matthew Wright

New Zealand is on top of the world this month. Auckland singer Ella Maria Lani Yelich-O’Connor, aged just 16 and better known as Lorde, knocked Miley Cyrus off the US charts and just went to No. 1 in the UK. And, more substantially for us writers, Eleanor Catton won the Man Booker Prize for her novel The Luminaries.

It’s the second time a Kiwi has won the coveted Booker. Catton’s win – coming after Lloyd Jones’ nomination and Keri Hulme’s similar win – also underscores just how much writing talent there is in New Zealand. I haven’t read Catton’s book yet, but I understand it flouts the usual structure – successfully – and that is SO hard to do well.

It’s set in New Zealand’s colonial gold rush, which is also bold. Those stories are topic de jour in New Zealand at the moment. I discovered this a while…

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Saturday Share [Reblog]: Sixty second writing tips: five things writers should always do

Five real quick tips from fellow kiwi, Matthew Wright.

Matthew Wright

I found a post the other day listing fifteen things writers should never do. Sensible enough – especially the rule about not begrudging others’ success.

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/there-are-no-rules/15-things-a-writer-should-never-do/

1195430130203966891liftarn_Writing_My_Master_s_Words_svg_medIn response I thought I’d come up with my own list of five things that I think writers should always do:

1. Write every day. Even if it’s only for 15 minutes.

2. Planning is important. I know there’s a debate over ‘seat-of-the-pants’ streams of consciousness versus planning. But trust me, in today’s market, it’s planning.

3. Put what you write in the proverbial drawer for a month after you think it’s finished. Then go back and finish it.

4. Accept that all writers think their own work sucks.

5. Always keep trying. No matter how glum things seem to be, keep at it. If one strategy doesn’t work, switch to another.

In the end, of course, it’s all about what works best…

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